Posts Tagged democracy

Satireday on Shit Happens

BpNUWNPCMAE597c

,

Leave a comment

Has Turkey Sprung?

Recep Tayyip Erdogan (Prime Minister)  says no; and in doing so has opened the gates to exactly that possibility. Talk about being the author of ones own possible demise.

Erdogan’s dismissive attitude to the mass demonstrations contrasted increasingly with President Abdullah Gul, who sounded conciliatory and pointedly rebutted Erdogan’s message. “Democracy does not mean elections alone,” he said, in what appeared to be a sharp riposte to the prime minister’s repeated insistence on the strength of his parliamentary mandate.”The Guardian

Indeed, the demonstrations are democracy in action. Democracy is what the people want, not what the prime minister wants.

The question is, why does Erdogan insist so vehemently  that these plans go ahead? Has he been paid by the developers for ensuring such a prime site? One must wonder. What other reason could there be?

But assuredly, Erdogan has blown his credibility, politically, I am sure he is finished.

What started as a protest over the redevelopment of a park has become a rebellion against the reign of the prime minister and the blame lies squarely on the prime minister’s shoulders.

Gezi Park, Istanbul

Gezi Park, Istanbul – image: The Examiner

The protestors have reason, cities need lungs, Gezi Park is just that in a sea of asphalt and buildings. Claimed to be the last green area in the city.

 

, , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

What’s for Dinner?

Sheeple_answer_2_xlarge

, ,

Leave a comment

The Burmese Tiger is Learning to Roar

Burma learns how to protest – against Chinese investors

Burma’s steps towards democracy have made it possible for people to protest publicly, for the first time in decades, against things they don’t like – and Chinese businesses have turned out to be top of their list.

Standing at the bottom of the vast open mine, I am a tiny matchstick figure.

My colleagues are standing hundreds of feet above but they can’t hear my shouts or even see my face.

From their perspective, the giant dumper trucks snaking their way to the bottom of the pit look like children’s toys.

This is one of the world’s top 10 copper deposits, expected to generate tens of billions of dollars over the next 30 years.

According to its Chinese co-owners, the metal extracted here, in the north-west Sagaing Region, is of the purest quality and much sought-after globally.

Most is destined for Japan, Malaysia and the Middle East, but Geng Yi, the young managing director from Beijing, believes Burma itself will soon be an important customer.

Mine Director, Geng Yi is frustrated by delays to the expansion of the mine

Although five decades of military rule have turned Burma – or Myanmar as the generals named it – into the poorest nation in the region, it has ambitions to become a “golden bridge” between the mega-economies of India and China.

To achieve this goal, cash from abroad is urgently needed.

“To be frank, we don’t have much capital to implement our economic reforms,” says Koko Hlaing, the government’s chief political adviser.

“Capitalism cannot be implemented without capital.”

The copper mine, is a joint venture between China’s Wanbao company – a subsidiary of the arms manufacturer, Norinco – and the deeply unpopular business arm of the Burmese military, which has lucrative stakes in everything from banking to beer, as well as a monopoly on the gems sector.

Its close connection to the men in khaki has also given it preferential contracts with foreign firms, such as this one clinched in 2011, before the nominally civilian government came to power.

But in the new Burma such deals are under public scrutiny.

The country recently held democratic elections, ended censorship and released hundreds of political prisoners. Now many are questioning authority for the first time in their lives.

Two cousins, whose faces are now famous across Burma, have become figureheads for opposition to a $1bn scheme to expand the mine, which will affect 8,000 acres (3,000 hectares) of farmland and 26 villages near the town of Monywa.

The farmers’ daughters, dubbed the Iron Ladies by a local poet, have led thousands of villagers, monks, environmental campaigners and other activists in protest, against what they say is the unlawful seizure of their land.

Iron Lady Aye Net says the mine waste contains acid, which damages the land

The women come from the village of Wet Hmay (which means Sleepy Pig in Burmese). Along with dozens of other households, they are refusing to move from their homes into a brand new village of identical, neatly spaced houses with corrugated metal roofs.

The younger cousin, Thwe Thwe Win has a round face, a husky voice and a manner as pungent as the garlic she sells in the market.

“We want the mine closed down immediately,” she says. “No-one should colonise our land.”

In their fields, which lie in the shadow of a towering waste dump, I meet her cousin Aye Net, who complains that her sesame and beans are much sparser since the mine expansion started.

“When it rains, water drains through the dump and on to our land. There’s something acid in it,” she says.

“We don’t want compensation. We just want to grow our crops and live here as we have for generations.”

U Wi Tatatema: The mountains are precious

Environmental campaigners and activists from the pro-democracy youth group Generation Wave joined the villagers’ protest.

Some locals have complained that the sulphuric acid used to leach copper from ore has contaminated drinking water although the Wanbao Company denies this.

U Wi Tatatema, a 21-year-old monk from the central city of Mandalay, says he read about the mining project in the newspapers and came to give his support.

“When I saw the village women sitting on the ground and singing the national anthem in protest, I cried,” he says.

“The mountains are as precious as our parents – so I felt as if they were slaughtering my own mother.”

Plans to relocate a sacred pagoda which was once home to a famous Buddhist teacher, helped to mobilise hundreds more of his fellow monks.

The pagoda is inside the construction site of the new expanded mine on Letpadaung Mountain

Along with other protesters, they occupied the hillside temple, in the heart of the mining complex, for several days.

Since they were forcibly evicted, it has been guarded night and day by police.

Geng Yi, the mine’s director, admits the protests made him feel “uncomfortable and unsafe” and he is still clearly frustrated by all the delays holding up the expansion plan.

“Without the rule of law and stability how can this country attract or protect foreign investments?” he asks.

“From our point of view, we would like the government and important people to pay attention.”

When the government finally reacted, the confrontation turned ugly.

On 28 November, riot police cleared the protest camps which had brought the mine to a standstill.

Nearly 100 villagers and monks were injured. Many suffered horrific burns caused by incendiary devices – possibly phosphorous shells.

The brutal crackdown was a stark reminder that the country’s transition to democracy is still in its infancy.

Many suspect the government acted to avoid angering China – the country’s powerful northern neighbour and biggest investor.

President Thein Sein’s popularity shot up last year after he suspended the $3.6bn Myitsone hydro-electric dam on the Irrawaddy river – another controversial Chinese mega-project – but perhaps he was warned not to make the same mistake twice.

Whatever the case, latent Sinophobia has recently exploded.

At a demonstration outside the Chinese Embassy in Rangoon one banner said “This is our Country – Dracula China Get out!”

Kyaw Min Swe, editor of The Voice newspaper, said many Burmese bitterly resent Beijing for its cosy relationship with the former military junta and are now determined China’s unchallenged dominance should end.

“The old regime got everything it needed from China – legitimacy, weapons and political support, like a veto in the UN Security Council and people had to put up with this for so many years.

“Now they are channelling all their anger with China into opposing this copper mine,” he says.

Six activists from the demo outside the embassy have been charged with holding a protest without permission. If found guilty they could face fines and two years in prison.

A parliamentary investigation into whether the mine expansion should be allowed to go ahead – chaired by opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi – is likely to condemn the police for their heavy handed response, when it reports in the next few days.

But the investigation is a poisoned chalice for the Nobel laureate.

It is unclear how far she will risk antagonising either China or the Burmese top brass – outside the halls of the new parliament the military still wields formidable power.

Immediately after the crackdown, at a rally in the nearby town of Monywa, Aung San Suu Kyi got cheers for denouncing police brutality, but she also stressed the importance of friendly ties with neighbouring countries.

As the icon of Burmese democracy her role was clearly defined – she struggled for freedom against one of the world’s most oppressive regimes.

But now that she is an elected politician, she has to deal with Iron Ladies as well as army generals.

000BBC_logo

, , , , , , , ,

2 Comments

The United States of ALEC

Bill Moyers on the Secretive Corporate-Legislative Body Writing Our Laws

 

Damn, the video won’t embed, check it out on the link below, sorry.

Democracy Now! premieres “The United States of ALEC,” a special report by legendary journalist Bill Moyers on how the secretive American Legislative Exchange Council has helped corporate America propose and even draft legislation for states across the country. ALEC brings together major U.S. corporations and right-wing legislators to craft and vote on “model” bills behind closed doors. It has come under increasing scrutiny for its role in promoting “stand your ground” gun laws, voter suppression bills, union-busting policies and other controversial legislation. Although billing itself as a “nonpartisan public-private partnership,” ALEC is actually a national network of state politicians and powerful corporations principally concerned with increasing corporate profits without public scrutiny. Moyers’ special will air this weekend on Moyers & Company, but first airs on Democracy Now! today. “The United States of ALEC” is a collaboration between Okapi Productions, LLC and the Schumann Media Center. [includes rush transcript]

Source: Democracy Now

Opinion:

See, it’s simple, your government is not in control of America, the corporations are!

Democracy in America is merely a figment of the voters’ collective imaginations.

,

Leave a comment

Repugnicans & Democraps

Once upon a time... to be an American was something to be proud of, alas no longer

I am NOT American; and for that I am thankful.

Given that I am not American my knowledge of the American political arena is superficial, maybe a little deeper than just superficial. But that is not to say I haven’t made some observations along the way as the system gears up for the elections.

Notably, of course, is the current round of caucuses for a nominee to challenge the incumbent Obama. Of the six candidates, five aren’t worth considering. And how the hell Mitt Romney got to where he is after Iowa and NH will remain for me a mystery.

This is how I currently see America

There is only one candidate who is challenging the status quo. It is this status quo that has got America so close to being covered in shit that to continue is catastrophic.

Therefore any vote that does not seriously challenge the way things are is a vote for the inevitable.

Now, I am not saying that the Democraps are the flavour of the day either; but the Repugnicans are just as bloody dangerous, both parties will ensure the total collapse of America.

The American people have got to see through the façade of both parties, they are tarred with the same brush, their ideals are the same, they are both hell bent on the ruination of the country to benefit their masters.

The government does not run the country.

That is a myth.

Both parties sold out to the corporations years ago. The fact that the USA is a democracy is a farce, it’s a joke; the whole world can see it but the American people can’t. The American people have been led to the chopping block like Thanksgiving turkeys fed and fattened on American Idol instead of corn.

The corporations have no conscience, they are raping and plundering the country beyond redemption.

CEOs earning $XXX million dollars, NO MAN is worth that amount of money. The money and bonuses paid to these bastards is OBSCENE! It is an insult to intelligent people.

The only hope that America might be salvaged is to rid the system of both parties, a complete purge. Any person who votes for either party is a domestic terrorist, a traitor to the nation. The answer, at least the minimal hope that America has is the Independent candidates not affiliated to the corporations. They are the only hope of ridding the country of the cancerous scourge that currently purports to be the government.

Occupy Wall Street was a great idea. It was the voice of the people who wanted to be heard. It was the voice of people who were prepared to stand up and say “This is wrong!”

But the myopic apathetic “American Dreamers” have let them down.

Occupy Wall Street was America’s chance, but you blew it!

If you are thinking on becoming an Independent, you are not alone…

The American independent: A voter on the rise

Ron Paul's support was buoyed by independent voters

Independent voters are at an all-time high in the US. But who are they?

This week, the Gallup organisation reported that more Americans identify as “independent” than ever before, and now well outnumber their Republican and Democratic counterparts.

Forty percent of Americans defined themselves as independent voters, compared to 27% who said they were Republicans and 31% who said they were Democrats, according to Gallup.

In the New Hampshire primary almost half the voters identified as independent, buoying support for the eventual second-placed candidate, Ron Paul.

The rise of independent voters speaks to the electorate’s increasing frustration with the current political climate. But it is also a particularly American phenomenon based on centuries of political and social narrative.

Proud decision

“Independent” is more than a political label indicating [someone who is] not identified as a Democrat or Republican, says Nancy Rosenblum, professor of government at Harvard, in an email to the BBC. “It broadcasts wholesale anti-partisanship.”

In that sense, calling oneself “Independent” is as much about declaring an identity as rejecting one.

Source: BBC News Read more

, , , ,

Leave a comment

Why is the USA Wooing Burma?

Hillary Clinton Burma visit: Suu Kyi hopeful on reforms

Hillary Clinton met Aung San Suu Kyi at the latter's Rangoon home

Aung San Suu Kyi has said she is hopeful that Burma can get on to “the road to democracy”, after talks with US Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

She welcomed reforms that have enabled her party to stand in elections, but said more needed to be done and called for political prisoners to be freed.

The democracy leader held a morning of talks with Mrs Clinton, the most senior US official to visit Burma in 50 years.

They promised to work together to promote democracy in Burma.

“I am very confident that if we work together… there will be no turning back from the road to democracy,” said Ms Suu Kyi after the talks.

But she added that the country was “not on that road yet”.

Source: BBC News Read more

Opinion:

I can’t help but wonder why the USA is wooing Burma?

Don’t get me wrong. I have nothing against Burma. I am pleased to see this small nation fighting and clawing its way out of a military dictatorship. Burma is one of the fascinating places in the world and deserves a better future.

But I fear the choice of bed-fellows.

The USA does nothing for anybody unless it benefits the USA and it’s bid for global control. And, I kid you not, if you can’t see it then you are blind. The USA military machine is spreading like a virus over the globe. “Spreading democracy!” What a load of bullshit! Utter crap! “Spreading the American way,” more like it; and the American way is not all apple pie as it used to be.

But I do see that Burma is strategically placed to help the USA in the face of China’s equally despicable ambitions; particularly in relation to the South China Sea issue. Which, I might add, is going to come to the boil in the near future; a time frame that could see the USA militarily esconced in Burma.

All I can say is; “Watch this space.”

, , , , , , , , ,

Leave a comment

History Repeats – Ragtag Armies

George Washington crossing the Delaware on Christmas 1776, leading what historians also called a “ragtag” Continental Army, surprising the British

All this was so obvious, so predictable. America is at a crossroads. Occupy Wall Street buildup has emerged as America’s last great hope to restore democracy. Last week when USA Today called the Occupiers a “ragtag assortment of college kids, labor unionists, conspiracy theorists and others” hinting they’re a flash-in-the-pan “devoid of remedies,” I smiled, reminded of that famous painting of George Washington crossing the Delaware on Christmas 1776, leading what historians also called a “ragtag” Continental Army, surprising the British, and winning the Battle of Trenton.

.

America’s collective conscience wants true democracy restored: Yes, USA Today sees a “ragtag” army: No mission, no goals, no organization, no agenda, no leaders, and no staying power. Wrong. Look deeper: The Occupiers are the voice of America’s collective conscience demanding a return to our 1776 roots, to a “government of the people, by the people, for the people.” Our collective inner voice knows America’s moral compass is broken. We’ve become a government “of, by and for” special interests, the wealthiest 1%, Wall Street insiders, CEOs and Forbes-400 billionaires. It happened fast: In one generation the Super Rich grabbed “absolute power,” killing the middle class American dream.

Source: Running ‘Cause I Can’t Fly read more

, , , ,

Leave a comment

%d bloggers like this: